Zen provisioning: Bootstrap the installation of Ansible using Vagrant

image0

I'm a big fan of the DevOps attitude of "cattle" versus "pets": machines should be built in a repeatable, automated and consistent way. If there's something wrong, don't be afraid to replace a sick "cow" instead of trying to revive your "pet".

This Zen mindset also helps when preparing for demo's, trainings and workshops: Usually I need a number of machines, and what better way than create them by using automation ? For that I'm using the tools Ansible, Packer, Vagrant and VirtualBox - they are all Open Source and can be used on a number of platforms (e.g. Windows, Linux and Mac OS X).

Ansible is a tool for managing systems and deploying applications, licensed under the GNU General Public License version 3 (my personal favorite).

Vagrant is a tool for managing virtual machines and is licensed under the MIT license.

VirtualBox is a virtualization environment for local use, licensed under the GNU General Public License version 2.

Packer creates a machine image by installing an operating system to a multitude of local and cloud platforms, for example VMWare, VirtualBox as well as Docker, Amazon EC2 and DigitalOcean. Packer is licensed under the Mozilla Public License Version 2.0.

How …

more ...

The future is here: HTTP/2

Last month I held a number of presentations on the latest and greatest HTTP/2 protocol. It's an area where there's currently a lot of demand for knowledge and practical tips. Most people are surprised to find out that the're actually already using it on a daily base.

If you're interested you could check out an Ansible role which installs a number of client-side and server-side tools all HTTP/2 enabled:

  • curl - A data transferring tool with HTTP/2 support
  • h2load - A benchmarking tool for HTTP/2 and SPDY servers
  • nghttp - A HTTP/2 client with SPDY support
  • nghttpd - A HTTP/2 server with SPDY support
  • nghttpx - A transparent HTTP/2 proxy with SPDY support
  • openssl - A cryptographic library with ALPN support (1.0.2-chacha)

The following libraries will be installed:

  • libcrypto - OpenSSL
  • libcurl - CURL library
  • libnghttp2 - A HTTP/2 and HPACK C library
  • libspdylay - A SPDY library
  • libssl - OpenSSL

You can find the role at https://github.com/PeterMosmans/ansible-role-http2

more ...

Safely storing Ansible playbook secrets

see the forest for the trees

More and more organizations use dedicated software to safely handle the creation and management of secrets (for example SSL certificate keys, private variables and passwords). Three 'well known' solutions are Square's Keywhiz, Hashicorp's Vault and crypt in combination with etcd or consul.

As with all security solutions the roll-out can be quite cumbersome. The correct implementation (think key management, think audit trails, think key recovery) of any one of these solutions is difficult. And difficult means that most people won't use it, at least not right away (remember SELinux ?).

There are a number of tools available to encrypt secrets within (Ansible) repositories. One of them for instance is Ansible Vault (look here for a more in-depth review). Although the idea of selectively encrypting data is a good one, text-oriented version control systems like git or Subversion aren't meant to store binary blobs of encrypted data. Moreover you still run the risk of accidentally uploading or sharing unencrypted files. Mitigations like adding filenames of unencrypted secrets to a .gitignore file are error-prone.

How to facilitate developers and system operators to store secrets in a safe place, outside the repositories where Ansible playbooks and configuration files are kept ?

This article describes a …

more ...

OpenSSL the Ansible vault... using PBKDF2

OpenSSL the Ansible vault

Ansible is a popular open-source software platform for configuring and managing computers. It helps sysadmins to provision new servers in a reliable and repeatable way, and helps developers who want to push their code as fast as possible. It takes scripts (playbooks) as input, which a lot of people can and do share with each other. The beauty of open source. Playbooks can contain sensitive data like passwords and SSL keys - stuff that you don't want to share, or incidentally upload to GitHub.

Last year Ansible added a tool to its arsenal to easily encrypt structured datafiles (containing sensitive data), called Ansible Vault. You can specify a key or keyfile when running a playbook, which decrypts the data on-the-fly. Encrypted data can still be edited

I love it when people make it easier to use encryption. The easier it becomes, the more people will use it, the safer everybody will be.

Another beauty of open source is that you can inspect the code. And modify it! I wanted to be able to encrypt and decrypt the data where/when you cannot use Ansible vault, by using other tools and languages like OpenSSL and Bash script.

Under the hood Ansible vault …

more ...